Online Graduate Certificates

Serving a Healthy Diet

Planning and implementing healthy meals for customers, clients, family, and friends can pose a challenge – especially when individual dietary preferences and health needs differ. How do you construct a menu that tastes good, meets the nutrient and health requirements for an individual or group, is culturally appropriate and responsibly sourced?

Health Properties of Food

In a world of conflicting food messages, how do we know which foods are good for us? And what is the evidence for why you might want to incorporate foods like avocados, beans, and berries more often into the meals you prepare? Students in this course will explore the relationship between diet and health by examining the habitual eating patterns (eg: Mediterranean-style, vegetarian, etc.) that have been shown to prevent and/or treat chronic diet-related conditions, such as hypertension, heart disease, type 2 diabetes, and certain cancers.

Nutrition and Innovation

Have you ever thought: “This would is a great idea for a new nutrition product or service?” but didn’t get very far in pitching the idea to others? In this class you will develop skills for identifying and advocating solutions to important consumer needs through case studies, team discussions, and real-life assignments.  You’ll gain experience cultivating an innovator's mindset in order to effectively understand real consumer needs, identify, improve and prioritize solutions, and take your idea pitching skills to a new level.

Current Controversies in Nutrition

Virtually no discipline attracts more public attention or generates more controversies than nutrition. The reasons for this vary. Food and nutrition can be viewed through multiple lenses: the personal, familial, communal, cultural, political, historical, and scientific. This course explores the scientific underpinnings of several hot topics and controversies, which will be examined from the perspectives of scientists and consumers (of food and media), with an undercurrent fostering self-understanding of implicit biases.

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