Healthy Communities and Behavior Change

Healthy Communities and Behavior Change

Healthy Communities and Behavior ChangeFrom the way a city is built to the food its citizens eat, research in the realm of healthy communities seeks to better serve people both locally in their communities or on a large scale globally to provide guidance, outreach, and methods that will create a healthier environment for all. 

 


Breaking the Pattern of Childhood Obesity

From the start, ChildObesity180’s approach to addressing the epidemic has been unique: combine rigorous research and evaluation, innovative strategies, multi-sector collaboration, and eventual widespread promulgation of evidence-based practices.

Community Collaboration with Carney Hospital

Concern about the health effects of sugar-sweetened beverages is mounting.

Christina Economos

Christina Economos, PhD, is a Professor and the New Balance Chair in Childhood Nutrition at the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy and Medical School at Tufts University. She is also the co-Founder and Director of ChildObesity180, a unique organization that brings together leaders from diverse disciplines to generate urgency, and find solutions to the childhood obesity epidemic. ChildObesity180 merges the best in nutrition and public health research and practice with the expertise and experience of business, government, and nonprofit leaders.

ChildObesity 180

Current childhood obesity statistics are dramatic and worrisome. Today's children may live shorter lives than their parents – a first in this nation’s history. Over the past 40 years, rates of obesity have doubled in 2- to 5-year-olds, quadrupled in 6- to 11-year-olds, and tripled in 12- to 19-year-olds. The causes of obesity are complex and interconnected. The environment created by culture, societal norms, community assets, and practices within the home all influence a child’s ability to make healthy choices and, ultimately, affect his or her weight status.

Cancer and Nutrition

A new study from Friedman's Fang Fang Zhang compared the dietary patterns of cancer survivors to federal guidelines, and found that they often fall short. Published in CANCER this week, and covered by the Los Angeles Times, her findings point to the need for dietary interventions in this vulnerable population. 

Jennifer Coates

Dr. Coates’s research focuses on the development of methods for improving the design, implementation, and evaluation of international nutrition and food security programs in both development and humanitarian emergency contexts.  Methods-related initiatives include the development and validation of: methods for scaling up global dietary data collection and use (INDDEX); indicators of the affordability of quality diets in Africa (IMMANA-IANDA); a standardized approach to malnutrition causal analysis and response assessment (ACF); methods for evaluating the micronutrient impact and functional health outcomes of national fortification programs (GAIN); dietary diversity indicators in emergency-prone contexts (WFP); and global experiential food security measures (FANTA). 

Jeanne Goldberg

Dr. Goldberg has worked on obesity and chronic disease prevention interventions since 1995 when she was principal investigator on a school-based intervention in Independence, Missouri and co-investigator on Sisters Together: Move More, Eat Better, an obesity prevention campaign for African American women. She was co-investigator on the Bones Project to prevent osteoporosis through early intervention, Shape Up Somerville, a CDC-funded obesity prevention program for elementary school children and their families, and on a replication of that project.

Sara C. Folta

Sara Folta's research interests focus on public health nutrition, or the utilization of community-based strategies for improving dietary intake, physical activity, and body composition. She has particular expertise in behavioral psychology, communications, and qualitative methods. A major line of Folta's research involves community-based interventions to improve heart health among women. A second area of research includes behavioral strategies to improve health and well-being among older adults, particularly through the development of physical activity interventions.

Robert F. Houser

Robert Francis Houser is a quantitative psychologist with backgrounds in behavioral psychology, social psychology, behavior modification, educational psychology, and quantitative research methods.  He is an assistant professor and statistical programmer/analyst at the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy where he teaches several statistics and research methodology courses.

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