Research Activities & Impact

The Friedman School is doing important work locally and globally in all areas of nutrition science and policy. We hope to illustrate the depth and breadth of our research and impact by detailing some of our projects and initiatives, both active and past. Browse activities using our major theme areas, or navigate using the map.

New Entry Sustainable Farming Project

In 1998, New Entry was launched by The Friedman School in order to develop a cost-effective strategy to integrate recent immigrants and refugees with farming backgrounds into Massachusetts agriculture. In 2007, New Entry conducted a broad environmental analysis of the burgeoning food movement and expanded its target audience to beginning farmers of all backgrounds with a desire to grow food to create a resilient local food economy.

Project Status: 
Active

Shape Up Somerville

Funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Shape Up Somerville: Eat Smart. Play Hard. was a 3-year (2002-2005), environmental change intervention designed to prevent obesity in culturally diverse, high-risk, early-elementary school children. Led by Dr. Christina Economos (N96), the Shape Up team developed and implemented strategies designed to create energy balance for 1st-3rd graders in Somerville. In before-, during-, and after-school environments, interventions were focused on increasing the number of physical activity options available to children throughout the day and on improving dietary choices.

Project Status: 
Past

Shape Up Under 5

Shape Up Under 5 (SUU5) is a pilot obesity prevention intervention in Somerville, MA as part of the COMPACT study, a 5-year NIH grant that brings together researchers from across the world to apply the principles of systems science to community-based childhood obesity preventions. The project united the work of early childhood advocates from different sectors (the ‘SUU5 Committee’) to create and promote a common set of evidence-based messages on healthy growth.

Project Status: 
Active

The Daily D Study: Impact of Vitamin D Supplementation on Cardiometabolic Risk in Schoolchildren

Vitamin D deficiency has been linked to the development of cardiovascular disease and it is estimated that six million children are currently vitamin D deficient. Vitamin D deficiency is even more common in northern latitudes, amongst some minority groups with darker skin pigmentation, and in those who are overweight or obese. In these groups, higher supplemental doses may be needed to maintain optimal serum levels and to prevent cardiovascular risk.

Project Status: 
Past

The GREEN Project Lunch Box Study

The GREEN Project Lunch Box Study is a school-based nutrition intervention designed to improve the nutritional quality of foods children bring from home to school. The three-year project, funded by the National Institutes of Health, involves the design, implementation, and evaluation of an innovative communications campaign for third and fourth grade students and their families. The pilot phase of the project was completed in June 2011, and the main intervention took place in schools throughout Eastern Massachusetts during the 2011-2012 school year.

Project Status: 
Past
There is no content to display.

Whoops. Something is wrong here. You shouldn't being seeing this. Please try to load the page again.