Agriculture, Food, and the Environment

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Agriculture, Food and Environment

Determinants of U.S. Food Policy

Focuses on government food-related programs from an economic and political perspective. Reviews the evolution of a range of policies and programs, analyzing their effects on the U.S. economy and on household consumption and the farm economy, as well as on food consumption at the national, household, and individual level. Existing policies and programs are related to the political and economic environment and to changing food consumption patterns in American society.

Agricultural Science and Policy I

First part of a two-semester sequence required of AFE students. This course covers the major biological, chemical and physical components of agricultural systems. Each is discussed from the viewpoints of both the underlying natural processes and principles, and their significance for major agricultural, food safety, and environmental policy issues in the US today. In the first semester, the topics covered are soils, water, nutrients, and genetic resources.

Fundamentals of Geographic Information Systems (GIS)

Many problems in agriculture, food and nutrition are inherently geographic in nature. For example, livestock production is increasingly concentrated in large feeding operations, leading to new spatial patterns of water and air pollution or foodborne illness. Spatial clustering is equally important for food consumption, nutrition and public health, as in hunger hotspots, food deserts and disease corridors.

Fundamentals of U.S. Agriculture

This course covers the major social, institutional and human aspects of the American agricultural system, both as it exists today as well as its historical development. After consideration of agricultural systems in general and of the values that underlie different concepts of agriculture, it covers some of the key historical forces that have made American agriculture what it is today, and the major role of the federal government, both past and present.

Statistical Methods for Nutrition Science and Policy

Part one of a one-year, two-semester course covering descriptive statistics, graphical displays, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, t test, chi-square test, nonparametric tests, multiple linear regression, multiple logistic regression, experimental design, multi-factor and multiple comparisons procedures. Students will learn how to use Stata statistical analysis software. 

LABS:  Selected Mondays and Wednesdays, 3:30pm – 5:00pm, Sackler 507.

Timothy Griffin

Timothy Griffin is the director of the Agriculture, Food and and Environment program, as well as an associate professor at the Friedman School. His primary interests are the intersection of agriculture and the environment, and the development and implementation of sustainable production systems.

Sean B. Cash

Sean B. Cash is an economist with the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University. His research focuses on how food, nutrition, and environmental interventions and policies affect both producers and consumers.

Fundamentals of Nutrition Policy and Programming: How Science and Practice Interact

This is a course that will allow students at the Friedman School to become familiar with policy processes (domestic and international), typologies of policy initiatives (laws, regulations, program interventions, legal restrictions and systems, institutional mandates), and to be able to critically analyze and discuss how policy and science interact with regard to food and nutrition.

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