News

Healthy Scouts, Healthy Communities

Healthy Scouts, Healthy Communities

For nearly 40 years The Friedman School has created leaders in nutrition, with a focus on building programs to affect real change toward healthier neighborhoods and communities. ChildObesity180 (CO180) is one of many successful initiatives grown out of Friedman's fertile ground. Bringing together the top leaders from business, academia, non-profits, and the scientific community, CO180 has proven that creating sustainable, scalable strategies to reduce and reverse childhood obesity can, and should, take an entire village.

Nutrition Innovations in Bangladesh

Nutrition Innovations in Bangladesh

In the People’s Republic of Bangladesh, producing enough fruits and vegetables as well as storing fish in ways that are both affordable and safe pose many challenges. To tackle these problems, the Nutrition and Horticulture Innovation Labs have joined together to implement three unique aquaculture and horticulture technologies.

A Science-Based Look at Genetically Engineered Crops

A Science-Based Look at Genetically Engineered Crops

The National Academies Press has released a report titled "Genetically Engineered Crops: Experiences and Prospects."

Timothy Griffin, associate professor and director of Friedman's Agriculture, Food and Environment program, served on the Committee on Genetically Engineered Crops, providing his expertise related to farming productivity and environmental impacts. 

Alice Lichtenstein, Friedman professor, senior scientist, and director of the HNRCA's Cardiovascular Nutrition Laboratory provided input as a member of the Food and Nutrition Board. 

Restaurant kids’ meals make nutrition strides, but leave room for improvement

Restaurant kids’ meals make nutrition strides, but leave room for improvement

Majority of children’s meal combinations at leading restaurants meet calorie criteria, according to a new study published in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior.

The Diet and Disease Connection

The Diet and Disease Connection

Alexandra Simas, a doctoral student at the Friedman School, is no novice at making connections between diet and disease. Her first patient was, well, herself.

5 Irrefutable Reasons Why Tufts School of Nutrition Was the Right Choice

5 Irrefutable Reasons Why Tufts School of Nutrition Was the Right Choice

Katie Mark is a second year MS/MPH student who will graduate in December 2016. Her experience at Tufts equipped her with the knowledge and skills and exposed her to the people that will help her pursue her career goal to become a registered dietitian working in sports nutrition with professional athletes. In Katie's words, here are five great reasons why Friedman was the right choice: (reposted with permission from The Friedman Sprout)

Award Winners at Experimental Biology Meeting

Award Winners at Experimental Biology Meeting

Three students in Friedman's Biochemical and Molecular Nutrition graduate program, as well as three HNRCA-affiliated Friedman professors received honors at this year's Experimental Biology meeting. 

You Are What Your Parents Eat

You Are What Your Parents Eat

In the winter of 1944, the western Netherlands faced a famine of epic proportions. A Nazi blockade had stopped all food or fuel from entering the region, forcing residents to eat whatever they could scrounge up—sometimes even grass or tulip bulbs. Many consumed as little as 600 calories a day, and by the time the famine eased that spring, more than 20,000 people had starved to death.

A Closer Look at Children's Physical Activity Patterns

A Closer Look at Children's Physical Activity Patterns

Children are far from meeting national guidelines for physical activity, and girls are at greatest risk of falling short of recommendations according to a study measuring the physical activity of 453 schoolchildren in Massachusetts during a one-week period.

Climate Change and Agriculture: Tufts Researchers Explore Changing Monsoon Patterns

Climate Change and Agriculture: Tufts Researchers Explore Changing Monsoon Patterns

Longer monsoon seasons with increased daily rainfall, aspects of climate change, are contributing to reduced tea yield in regions of China, with implications for crop management and harvesting strategies, according to findings by a global interdisciplinary team led by Tufts University researchers and published online recently in Climate.

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