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The Diet and Disease Connection

The Diet and Disease Connection

Alexandra Simas, a doctoral student at the Friedman School, is no novice at making connections between diet and disease. Her first patient was, well, herself.

5 Irrefutable Reasons Why Tufts School of Nutrition Was the Right Choice

5 Irrefutable Reasons Why Tufts School of Nutrition Was the Right Choice

Katie Mark is a second year MS/MPH student who will graduate in December 2016. Her experience at Tufts equipped her with the knowledge and skills and exposed her to the people that will help her pursue her career goal to become a registered dietitian working in sports nutrition with professional athletes. In Katie's words, here are five great reasons why Friedman was the right choice: (reposted with permission from The Friedman Sprout)

Award Winners at Experimental Biology Meeting

Award Winners at Experimental Biology Meeting

Three students in Friedman's Biochemical and Molecular Nutrition graduate program, as well as three HNRCA-affiliated Friedman professors received honors at this year's Experimental Biology meeting. 

You Are What Your Parents Eat

You Are What Your Parents Eat

In the winter of 1944, the western Netherlands faced a famine of epic proportions. A Nazi blockade had stopped all food or fuel from entering the region, forcing residents to eat whatever they could scrounge up—sometimes even grass or tulip bulbs. Many consumed as little as 600 calories a day, and by the time the famine eased that spring, more than 20,000 people had starved to death.

A Closer Look at Children's Physical Activity Patterns

A Closer Look at Children's Physical Activity Patterns

Children are far from meeting national guidelines for physical activity, and girls are at greatest risk of falling short of recommendations according to a study measuring the physical activity of 453 schoolchildren in Massachusetts during a one-week period.

Climate Change and Agriculture: Tufts Researchers Explore Changing Monsoon Patterns

Climate Change and Agriculture: Tufts Researchers Explore Changing Monsoon Patterns

Longer monsoon seasons with increased daily rainfall, aspects of climate change, are contributing to reduced tea yield in regions of China, with implications for crop management and harvesting strategies, according to findings by a global interdisciplinary team led by Tufts University researchers and published online recently in Climate.

Cash Transfer Programming for Syrian Refugees

Cash Transfer Programming for Syrian Refugees

Karen Jacobsen, acting director of the Feinstein International Center, recently published a new report concerning optimization of cash transfer programs (CTPs) in humanitarian contexts. 

The publication, titled "Cash Transfer Programming for Syrian Refugees: Lessons Learned on Vulnerability, Targeting, and Protection from the Danish Refugee Council's E-Voucher Intervention in Southern Turkey," provides insight into three key components of CTPs:

Innovation Against Infection

Innovation Against Infection

As anyone who has tried to modify their eating habits or sleeping patterns knows, public health campaigns, medical advances, and scientific findings, do not always translate into immediate behavioral change.  Long-lasting improvements in health and well-being require researchers who consider political, cultural, and economic factors alongside vital human health concerns.

Sleep and Weight Gain

Sleep and Weight Gain

When it comes to studying the causes of weight gain and obesity, nutrition researchers rightly focus on the interaction between diet and exercise. They’re just starting to understand the influence of an activity that humans engage in for a third of their lives—sleep.

Malawi Dietetics Program Accredited

Malawi Dietetics Program Accredited

The Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Nutrition takes great pleasure in announcing the launch of a new clinical nutrition dietetics program in Malawi.

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