Obesity and Diabetes

The Diet and Disease Connection

The Diet and Disease Connection

Alexandra Simas, a doctoral student at the Friedman School, is no novice at making connections between diet and disease. Her first patient was, well, herself.

A Closer Look at Children's Physical Activity Patterns

A Closer Look at Children's Physical Activity Patterns

Children are far from meeting national guidelines for physical activity, and girls are at greatest risk of falling short of recommendations according to a study measuring the physical activity of 453 schoolchildren in Massachusetts during a one-week period.

Dangerous Drinks

Dangerous Drinks

In public health circles, it’s often called the low-hanging fruit. If people could just kick the sugar-sweetened beverage habit, it would make a huge dent in the number of empty calories they consume. Sugary drinks often have no nutrients other than sugar, so it’s a simple cut-it-out message that even kids can understand—no fussing with fiber grams or glycemic index rankings, no shopping for fruits and vegetables.

Restaurant Meals Tipping the Scales

Restaurant Meals Tipping the Scales

Meals consumed at fast-food restaurants are often seen as one of the biggest contributors to the obesity epidemic. But according to a new study in the Journal of the American Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, 92 percent of 364 measured restaurant meals from both large-chain and non-chain (local) restaurants exceeded recommended calorie requirements for a single meal. In 123 restaurants in three cities across America, the research team found that a single meal serving, without beverages, appetizers, or desserts sometimes exceeded the caloric requirements for an entire day.

Daily Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Habit Linked to Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

Daily Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Habit Linked to Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

A daily sugar-sweetened beverage habit may increase the risk for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), researchers from the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging (USDA HNRCA) at Tufts University report today in the Journal of Hepatology.

Cancer and Nutrition

Cancer and Nutrition

A new study from Friedman's Fang Fang Zhang compared the dietary patterns of cancer survivors to federal guidelines, and found that they often fall short. Published in CANCER this week, and covered by the Los Angeles Times, her findings point to the need for dietary interventions in this vulnerable population. 

Sugary Drinks Linked to High Death Tolls Worldwide

Sugary Drinks Linked to High Death Tolls Worldwide

Consumption of sugary drinks may lead to an estimated 184,000 adult deaths each year worldwide, according to research published today in  the journal Circulation and previously presented as an abstract at the American Heart Association Council on Epidemiology and Prevention in 2013.

Surveys Reveal Trends in Global Consumption of Sugary Beverages, Fruit Juices and Milk

Surveys Reveal Trends in Global Consumption of Sugary Beverages, Fruit Juices and Milk

Results Can Inform Research on Beverage Health Impacts and Nutrition Policy Development

Data on beverage intakes in 187 countries reveal diversity in existing intakes and trends in global consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages, fruit juices and milk. A research team led by scientists from the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University reported today in PLOS ONE that the consumption of all three types of beverages was lowest in East Asia and sugar-sweetened beverage consumption was highest in the Caribbean.

Lowering sugar-sweetened beverage intake by children linked to more favorable HDL-C changes

Lowering sugar-sweetened beverage intake by children linked to more favorable HDL-C changes

In the first study to investigate blood lipid levels in association with consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) in a racially and ethnically diverse sample of Boston area schoolchildren, researchers found there was an inverse association between SSB intake changes and HDL-cholesterol increases (HDL-C is the "good cholesterol").

 

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