Healthy Communities and Behavior Change

Ready, Set, Go!

Ready, Set, Go!

Baby boomers will face many barriers to good nutrition as they age. It’s time to get prepared.
Catalyzing Innovation and Collaboration

Catalyzing Innovation and Collaboration

Each year, Tufts Office of the Provost and Senior Vice President sponsors two seed grant programs, Tufts Collaborates and Tufts Innovates; sparking research collaboration among disparate faculty members, and catalyzing innovative ideas for learning and teaching across campus. 
Spotlight on Developing Healthy Communities

Spotlight on Developing Healthy Communities

Chandra Davis, a former student in the Developing Healthy Communities Online Graduate Certificate program, began her academic career by earning a BS in Biology from Tuskegee University. Nutrition would later become a guiding theme in her life, but back then, although she knew Tuskegee had a nutrition program, it wasn’t yet her main focus.
Healthy Scouts, Healthy Communities

Healthy Scouts, Healthy Communities

For nearly 40 years The Friedman School has created leaders in nutrition, with a focus on building programs to affect real change toward healthier neighborhoods and communities. ChildObesity180 (CO180) is one of many successful initiatives grown out of Friedman's fertile ground. Bringing together the top leaders from business, academia, non-profits, and the scientific community, CO180 has proven that creating sustainable, scalable strategies to reduce and reverse childhood obesity can, and should, take an entire village.
Restaurant kids’ meals make nutrition strides, but leave room for improvement

Restaurant kids’ meals make nutrition strides, but leave room for improvement

Majority of children’s meal combinations at leading restaurants meet calorie criteria, according to a new study published in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior.
A Closer Look at Children's Physical Activity Patterns

A Closer Look at Children's Physical Activity Patterns

Children are far from meeting national guidelines for physical activity, and girls are at greatest risk of falling short of recommendations according to a study measuring the physical activity of 453 schoolchildren in Massachusetts during a one-week period.
Dangerous Drinks

Dangerous Drinks

In public health circles, it’s often called the low-hanging fruit. If people could just kick the sugar-sweetened beverage habit, it would make a huge dent in the number of empty calories they consume. Sugary drinks often have no nutrients other than sugar, so it’s a simple cut-it-out message that even kids can understand—no fussing with fiber grams or glycemic index rankings, no shopping for fruits and vegetables.
The Prisoner's Nutrition Dilemma

The Prisoner's Nutrition Dilemma

Inmates take a hard look at their delinquent diets with help from Friedman alums.... Snacking is pervasive at the Massachusetts Correctional Institute at Norfolk, a medium security prison for men just south of Boston. A pint of Ben & Jerry’s is a daily ritual for some, and a common treat is the “honey bun sandwich”—a chocolate bar melted between two honey buns, totaling more than 1,500 calories. The inmates snack out of boredom, missing their families, or depression. 
A Nutrition Policy Balancing Act

A Nutrition Policy Balancing Act

The new U.S. Dietary Guidelines, which focus on eating patterns more than individual foods, are stirring controversy among experts. Is it perfect? No one seems to think so. But if you want a plan to gently nudge Americans away from the unhealthy way of eating we’re accustomed to, you could do worse than the 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, which were released on Jan. 7.
Restaurant Meals Tipping the Scales

Restaurant Meals Tipping the Scales

Meals consumed at fast-food restaurants are often seen as one of the biggest contributors to the obesity epidemic. But according to a new study in the Journal of the American Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, 92 percent of 364 measured restaurant meals from both large-chain and non-chain (local) restaurants exceeded recommended calorie requirements for a single meal. In 123 restaurants in three cities across America, the research team found that a single meal serving, without beverages, appetizers, or desserts sometimes exceeded the caloric requirements for an entire day.