Renata Micha
Research Assistant Professor


Dr. Micha is a registered clinical dietician, public health nutritionist and epidemiologist whose research focuses on the effects of diet on chronic diseases, mainly cardiometabolic diseases, and on population strategies to improve diet, utilizing multiple research paradigms. She has particular interest and experience in global dietary assessment among various population subgroups, identifying causal diet-disease relationships, quantifying and modeling the impact of dietary habits on chronic diseases, and evaluating the comparative effectiveness of dietary policies. 

During her postdoc at Harvard, she mainly focused on leading the work of the 2010 Global Burden of Diseases (GBD) Nutrition and Chronic Diseases Expert Group (NutriCoDE), a global WHO project funded by Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. In November 2011 she was appointed Research Associate (junior faculty) at the Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, and in July 2014 she was appointed Research Assistant Professor at Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, Tufts University. In this role, she is involved in cutting edge international research, including expanding the 2010 GBD NutriCoDE work and evaluating the comparative-effectiveness of population strategies and policies to improve diet and reduce cardiovascular disease. Furthermore, in Greece she was instrumental in the design, development, and funding of the 1st Hellenic National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (H-NHANES), the largest national surveillance survey of its kind to ever take place in Greece.  In addition to her research, Dr. Micha has extensive teaching experience. She has developed and led teaching for one undergraduate and three graduate courses in the field of nutritional science, including in nutritional epidemiology, public health nutrition, and advanced research methods. She has designed and contributed to multiple epidemiological studies (clinical and observational) relating to the investigation of the effect of diet on the development of chronic diseases, particularly cardiometabolic diseases. 

Dr. Micha has received several awards and honours, and she is an ad hoc manuscript reviewer in international journals, including the New England Journal of Medicine. She has authored more than 45 publications on diet and cardiovascular health in high impact scientific journals, such as Circulation, British Medical Journal, the New England Journal of Medicine, Lancet, and PLoS Medicine; presented more than 40 abstracts in international scientific meetings; is a co-author of 3 international books; and a co-editor of 1 book.


Education

  • Post-doc, 2008-2011, Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Harvard University
  • Ph.D., 2008, Public Health Nutrition, King’s College London, UK
  • Degree, 2004, Nutrition and Dietetics, Harokopio University of Athens, Greece

Research Activities

Ongoing Projects:

  1. PI for Economic Analyses of Policy Strategies to Improve Diet and Reduce CVD in the US, funded by NIH/NHLBI (R01 HL130735). 
  2. PI for Measuring Individual-level Consumption from Household Data, funded by the World Bank.
  3. PI for Epidemiological Research on Circulating Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids in Relation to Cardiometabolic Health within the Fatty Acids and Outcomes Research Consortium (CHARGE-FORCE consortium lead by Dean Dariush Mozaffarian), funded by Unilever. Visit the Website.
  4. Co-Investigator for the Global Dietary Database - Global Dietary Intakes and Diseases Among Children, Women, and Women (lead by Dean Dariush Mozaffarian), funded by Gates Foundation. Visit the Website
  5. Co-Investigator for Comparative-Effectiveness of Population Strategies to Improve Diet and Reduce CVD (lead by Dean Dariush Mozaffarian), funded by NIH/NHLBI (R01 HL115189).

News and Media

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Dietary Factors and Deaths From Disease


March 7, 2017- Nearly half of all deaths due to heart disease, stroke, and type 2 diabetes in the U...

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Cost-Effectiveness of Salt Reduction


Government-supported policy projected to be a highly cost-effective way to reduce salt consumption...

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Healthy Fats and Improvement of Risk Factors for Type 2 Diabetes


Eating more healthy fats in place of either carbs or saturated fats improves risk factors for type...

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